CCMAC

Mission:

The Colette Coyne Memorial Melanoma Foundation is dedicated to:

  • Increasing public awareness regarding the dangers and causes of Skin Cancer/Melanoma.
  • Early education of our youth, families and the community.
  • Changing attitudes, thinking, and behaviors regarding unprotected exposure to the Sun’s UV Rays, tanning, and tanning bed use.
  • Advocating for Laws and Policies designed to protect individuals and communities from the Sun’s UV Rays, and use of tanning beds.
  • Increasing funding for Education and Research.

 CCMAC is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization.

History:

The Colette Coyne Melanoma Awareness Campaign (CCMAC) began in 1998 in response to the death of an exceptional thirty-year-old woman named Colette Marie Brigid Coyne.

Realizing there was little awareness regarding the danger of skin cancer on Long Island, this foundation was established through the efforts of those touched by her life.

Our hope is that others and their loved ones will be spared the pain and suffering of this deadly disease, Melanoma.

What We Do:

CCMAC provides, coordinates and participates in a variety of education and awareness initiatives designed to increase public awareness regarding the dangers and causes of Skin Cancer/Melanoma. Every year CCMAC host’s, a Miles for Melanoma Run/Walk at Eisenhower Park, a FREE Skin Cancer Screening at Jones Beach State Park, a Dinner Dance and Auction, and a wide variety of community activities.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that the primary source of Sun Safety Education is in schools and that the secondary source of education is through recreational and sports activities. The CDC also acknowledges that educational programs and curricula in schools alone are inadequate to stop the rising rates of Skin Cancer in America. They recommend that the prevention and education efforts in schools are supported and reinforced by skin cancer prevention interventions in recreation, sports, and community settings.

CCMAC decided to target children and teens e.g., K – 12, with an emphasis on the K – 8 grades for the following reasons:

  • It has been found that sun exposure at an early age, before the age of 18 influences your risk for developing Skin Cancer / Melanoma.
  • It is easier to teach children in the K – 8, and K – 12 grades new behaviors, than to change behaviors of the adult population.

In order for children and others to successfully incorporate newly acquired knowledge and skills into their daily lives, the knowledge and skills must be reinforced, and supported. Children and others must hear, see and witness the “Be Sun Smart” message in the communities in which they live and play. It is for these reasons that CCMAC is engaged in a comprehensive and systemic approach to increasing awareness and changing behaviors of children and youth. CCMAC’s “Be Sun Smart®” message is delivered in schools, at organized community recreation activities, at community events, in the workplace, at local and state recreation facilities, during legislative sessions and testifying in front of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

All of CCMAC’s prevention and education messages and strategies to raise awareness are based on, and guided by both the research and practice communities who have long been involved in the battle against Skin Cancer and Melanoma e.g., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Coalition for Sun Safety, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), the American Cancer Society and the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

CCMAC has also modeled some of its prevention strategies after the work that has been accomplished in Australia. Australia has one of world’s highest rates of Skin Cancer / Melanoma, however, for the year 2009, reported no increases in the number of skin cancer /melanoma cases. This has largely been attributed to the ongoing prevention and education efforts that have been going on in that country for years.

CCMAC is also guided by the expertise and direction of its Medical Director, Dr. Ashfaq Marghoob, of Sloan Kettering Memorial Hospital, Hauppauge, NY.